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Microbiology and Biotechnology Letters

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Bioactive Compounds / Food Microbiology  |  Probiotics and Foodborne Microorganisms

Microbiol. Biotechnol. Lett. 2019; 47(2): 220-233

https://doi.org/10.4014/mbl.1812.12009

Received: December 17, 2018; Accepted: February 7, 2019

Optimization of Streptococcus macedonicus MBF10-2 Lysate Production in Plant-based Medium by Using Response Surface Methodology

Dini Andyanti 1, Fatin M Dani 1, Wibowo Mangunwardoyo 2, Muhamad Sahlan 3 and Amarila Malik 1*

1Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Biotechnology Research Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, 2Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Biotechnology Research Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, 3Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Universitas Indonesia, 4Bioprocess Research Group, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, 5Division of Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia

Bacterial lysates have become a common ingredient for natural health care. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) could serve as potential candidates for lysate production: the lactic acids produced by LAB have been utilized for their moisturizing, antimicrobial, and rejuvenating effects, while other substances provide topical benefits and health effects for the skin. Our study aimed to obtain lysate from a LAB S. macedonicus MBF 10-2 through an optimized fermentation using the Response Surface Methodology. Strain MBF10-2 was cultivated in a 2L fermenter tank in de Man Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium and in plant-based peptone modified MRS, i.e. Soy-peptone and Vegitone. The duration and the medium composition (dextrose and soy peptone or proteose peptone) were adjusted to obtain an optimum production of cell lysate. Central Composite Design was employed for Design Expert 7.0.0 by adjusting 3 factors: dextrose (1%, 1.5%, 2%, 2.5%, 3%), soy or proteose peptone (0.5%, 0.75%, 1%, 1.25% and 1.5%), and duration of fermentation (8, 10, 12 14, and 16 h for MRS-Soy peptone and 15, 17, 19, 21, and 23 h for MRS Vegitone). Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitor Substance activity of lysate and pH were used as indicators. The optimum condition for lysate production using MRS Soy Peptone and Vegitone are as follows: dextrose concentration 2.5%, plant-based peptone 1.25%, while optimum fermentation duration were 11.18 h (MRS Soy Peptone) and 17 h (MRS Vegitone) with a starter concentration of 10% at OD600nm 0.2 ± 0.05. However, the standard MRS medium produced better quality lysate compared to MRS plant-based peptones.

Keywords: Bacterial lysate, bacteriocin, Lactic acid bacteria, MRS, response Surface Methodology, Streptococcus macedonicus

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