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Microbiology and Biotechnology Letters

총설(Review)

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Food Microbiology (FM)

Microbiol. Biotechnol. Lett. 2020; 48(4): 423-428

https://doi.org/10.48022/mbl.2009.09004

Received: September 7, 2020; Accepted: October 11, 2020

Advanced Technologies and Mechanisms for Yeast Evolutionary Engineering

Hong-Yeoul Ryu *

School of Life Sciences, BK21 Plus KNU Creative BioResearch Group, College of National Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Republic of Korea

Correspondence to :
Hong-Yeoul Ryu*     rhr4757@knu.ac.kr

In vitro evolution is a powerful technique for the engineering of yeast strains to study cellular mechanisms associated with evolutionary adaptation; strains with desirable traits for industrial processes can also be generated. There are two distinct approaches to generate evolved strains in vitro: the sequential transfer of cells in the stationary phase into fresh medium or the continuous growth of cells in a chemostat bioreactor via the constant supply of fresh medium. In culture, evolutionary forces drive diverse adaptive mechanisms within the cell to overcome environmental or intracellular stressors. Especially, this engineering strategy has expanded to the field of human cell lines; the understanding of such adaptive mechanisms provides promising targets for the treatment of human genetic diseases and cancer. Therefore, this technology has the potential to generate numerous industrial, medical, and academic applications.

Keywords: Evolutionary engineering, in vitro evolution, yeast, adaptive mechanisms, gene therapy

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